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Work From Home Burnout

May 4th, 2020

Finding balance, giving yourself grace, and accepting that everything isn’t just fine.

Working from home is a privilege that does not require risking our own health and safety every day. We know that the inconvenience of barking dogs or tiny city dwellings are annoying, but far better than the reality that many are facing.

However, even in what we could call the ‘best of conditions’, there is a real risk of burnout that can affect productivity, expectations, and overall mental well-being. We have scraped together new routines over the last several weeks; all while dealing with some level of anxiety and frustration. What signs of burnout should you look for and how do you change the mindset?

Guilt & Anxiety

You feel guilty about the work that you are doing (or not doing). Perhaps you should have done one more item on your checklist, finished up one last project, or made one more phone call. After all, you’re saving time on the commute, going out for lunch, and socializing with co-workers.

Perhaps you are comparing yourself to your co-workers and it’s causing anxiety & guilt? If your co-worker sent an email at 6:30 am, does that mean that you should be doing the same? It is easy to want to create benchmarks.  You can rationalize the decisions that you are making when there is a beacon guiding you.  But this is a time when we’re juggling new systems, children at home, and schedule disruptions. Focus on what is expected of you and lay out those expectations with your manager so there are no ‘should have’, ‘could have’ feelings.

You’re making yourself available 24 hours a day

Your office phone is forwarded to your cell phone, the video conferencing app is downloaded, and your email notifications come through to every device you own. You’re feeling the need to be available and accessible 24 hours a day – trying to avoid the ‘out of sight, out of mind”.

Being in a cycle of constant visibility and accessibility to your co-workers or managers is exhausting. If you wouldn’t do it in a normal office setting, then you shouldn’t be doing it in a work-from-home setting. Even if you are not working all-day, every day — if you’re feeling the need to be available all of the time, this may affect your ability to wind down and recharge . Find the right time to turn off notifications, stop answering emails, and communicate with co-workers. If you’re feeling uneasy about not being available at a moment’s notice, talk to your manager about your schedule and when you cannot be immediately available.

You can’t stop working

Not only are you available 24-hours a day, but you are working many more hours than you normally would. You’re skipping meals, breaks, and exercise in favor of getting work done.

While you may think that you’re being more productive by stretching out eight-hour days to twelve, fourteen, or more – it’s likely that you’re not taking care of yourself as well as you should. There are many instances in which working too much actually provides diminishing returns in work quality.

This is the time to set boundaries and create a schedule to force yourself to stop and take a breath.  Schedule breaks, exercise, lunch, and shutdown times.  Ensure that meetings are scheduled within normal working hours.  It is imperative to draw a line under the day and end it when it needs to end. If you wouldn’t have answered a late-night email before working from home, then you shouldn’t be doing it now.

You can’t find your groove

Working from home is not for everyone . It just isn’t. It can be a nice break from time-to-time, but for many, it just isn’t part of their routine that gets them out of bed and ready to tackle the day. Some people genuinely enjoy the in-office interaction or the face-to-face meetings with clients. 

If you’ve never gotten into the WFH groove and you are resenting the situation as time passes, this can trickle down to other parts of your life.  Are you overreacting to professional and personal situations that wouldn’t normally irk you? Are you struggling to use the makeshift home-office that you set up? Are you accumulating take-out containers as you work from bed (for the 3rd week in a row)?

Acknowledging the burnout is the first step to dealing with the situation. While it may seem like everyone else has got this down, it’s very likely that they’re facing similar challenges. There is only so much that you can see in a video conference call or via email.


At the end of the day, it may be hard to avoid the burnout. You may be in a situation where you’re playing the role of parent, teacher, and employee.  Dramatically changing your routine may not be in the cards; but very small measurable steps can help you get through each day and help you to slowly take control of the burnout. Things may not go back to the normal that we now yearn, but this situation isn’t permanent and we must take care of ourselves in order to be better employees, families, and members of society.

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Posted in Career Tips, Talener Blog

Conference Calls, Couches & Keeping My Sanity: I Hate Working From Home

March 17th, 2020

Woman with brown shoulder-length hair holding her hands to her face as she works from home in front of a computer
Shot of a young woman looking stressed while using a laptop to work from home

There is an allure to working from home if you are an on-site employee.  Just once a week, it would be nice to skip the commute, work from bed, and play music while you type away.  If you regularly work from home, then you likely have a schedule, a set-up, and have chosen this type of work lifestyle.  You’re prepared and your daily life likely hasn’t changed too much. 

But for many, navigating the work-from-home model during the COVID-19 outbreak means a drastic adjustment to everyday life.  There are plenty of great tips and tricks to making your space work-friendly and keeping yourself focused.  But what happens when you hate working from home? What happens when you thrive on your office environment for conversation, motivation, and energy?

Particularly in this critical moment, work-from-home doesn’t mean work-from-anywhere — libraries, cafes, and public spaces are closed in many states and people are being strongly encouraged to isolate themselves.

As inherently social creatures (even introverts!), forced isolation can be tough. Spending a weekend binging your favorite show and never leaving your home is a choice. But somehow, when it’s forced, it’s no longer enjoyable.

So how do you get through the dread of working from home while everyone else is celebrating in their pajamas?

Take a Break

Sometimes lack of motivation is tough for newly minted work-from-home employees. But sometimes the opposite is true.  Overworking yourself to make the day go by faster — without taking your normal breaks can burn you out.  It’s far easier to leave a physical office at the end of the day and mentally shut down.

Being motivated and productive is great, but if you are going to be in a forced work-from-home environment for the foreseeable future, then scheduling breaks and a firm end-of-workday time, are critical.

Take a walk, bake, call your friends, check in on your parents, or catch up on your favorite drama.  Take a few moments to stop working and bring some normalcy back into your life.

Encourage Communication

It’s so easy to ask a question and collaborate when you’re in a shared office space.  “Have a minute? Can I run something by you?” – it seems trivial until you have to try to schedule a time to meet or need an answer ASAP.

If you have a team, or a close group of co-workers with whom you have regular contact, schedule a few five or ten-minute sessions every day to video conference with them. These are the people who make your in-office experience great.  It’s easy to chat via instant messaging, but socialization and communication needs aren’t always met this way.  Maybe it’s a laugh or a quick catch up to get you re-energized before the next big project.

Change it Up

Chances are, if your company has allowed (or mandated) work-from-home, then you have some flexibility in your schedule.  If you are in a position where you only need to be physically present during core hours or mandatory meetings, talk to your manager about working when you are most productive. Try to align your schedule with your natural cycle of productivity. Take advantage of your night-owl or early-bird tendencies.  You may find larger chunks of time during the day that you can focus on yourself, your family, or your home.

At the end of the day, for many, this mandated work-from-home model is short-term. For the weeks ahead, we can adjust, adapt and know that we are doing this for the greater good and to stop the spread of Coronavirus.  But it’s important to acknowledge that working from home is not for everyone. It isn’t always as simple as eating breakfast in bed, in your pajamas, and going about your day as if nothing has changed. 


Talener is committed to the safety and health of its employees, clients and candidates. All Talener offices are currently working from a work-from-home model. It is important that we are able to have a happy and healthy team who can continue to help candidates find jobs and help clients fulfill business needs during this unprecedented time. We thank you for all of your patience and for adapting your practices as we all navigate these changes.

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Posted in Talener Blog

Interviewing During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak

March 6th, 2020

Planning for modified hiring processes, handshakes, and video conferences

Businesses and people across the country are preparing for a potential pandemic of COVID-19, the Novel Coronavirus.  But today, like any other day, millions of people woke up, got themselves ready, and made the commute to work. For the vast majority of employees who don’t work 100% remotely, physically coming into work is a reality, pandemic or not.

Employers are making business continuity plans, and major companies like Twitter and Ford are banning all non-essential travel.  Google and Facebook both canceled their developer conferences in the wake of the outbreak. Some have even restricted their own employees from offices until they complete a mandatory quarantine after traveling to high-risk areas for business or pleasure. 

But businesses must continue to operate. And part of operating means hiring new employees as business needs arise.  The use of phone interviews or video calls is widespread for early stages of the hiring process, but most companies require an in-person meeting at least once before extending an offer.

If you are working with a staffing agency like Talener, your representative is your advocate – especially if you have concerns or questions regarding on-site interviews. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and get answers prior to going on-site. If companies have enacted work-from-home policies, ask how it affects your ability to interview as well as your potential start with the organization.

If you are working on your own, most hiring managers or HR will appreciate the heads up about any concerns you may have.

Travel

If you have traveled to a high-risk area recently, please be courteous to your interviewers and give them a heads up to confirm if they would like to re-schedule, conduct a video conference, or have you come into the office.  

Likewise, if you know that the company at which you are applying has international offices in high-risk areas and employees who travel frequently, you should ask the hiring manager or your staffing representative if they are taking any precautions with their own staff.

Sickness

Experiencing sever cold or flu-like symptoms before your interview?  It is in your best interest and the interviewers to give them as much notice as possible if you are feeling under the weather.  While canceling an interview is never ideal, providing as much notice as you can is always the right decision. 

This is particularly true if you have traveled to risk-areas or if you live in a densely populated area where you are in constant contact with people at shops, restaurants, or on public transportation.

Shaking Hands

It is OK to let your interviewer know that you are trying to follow universal precautions during the outbreak. If you’ve been on public transportation, take this approach, “I was just on the subway, could you point me to the restroom to wash my hands before we get started?”

If you are uncomfortable skipping the handshake, keep hand sanitizer with you or ask to use the restroom to wash your hands before you begin your interview.

Continuity Plans

Many companies have business continuity and disaster plans in place, particularly in densely populated areas or if they have employees that travel regularly.  During the interview, ask about work-from-home policies, policies on personal and work-sponsored travel, and expectations.

During this time, your Talener representatives are in constant contact with clients. They are learning about continuity plans as they emerge as well as making alternative arrangements if in-person interviews are not a viable option. If you have questions about a company with whom you are interviewing, use Talener as a resource.

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For more information about the Novel Coronvirus (COVID-19), the WHO, CDC, and National Institute of Health provide universal precautionary measures as well as information about the spread of the virus.

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Posted in FAQ, Talener Blog

Six Reasons to Hire Temp-to-Perm Employees

October 9th, 2019

Multiracial young creative people in modern office. Successful hipster team in coworking. Businesspeople walking in the corridor of an business center. Motion blur.

The perfect employee isn’t always standing on your doorstep waiting to apply for your job. Or, the right fit for your company might be missing a few ideal skills.  And sometimes, it isn’t about the employee at all. A project could terminate early or evolve into something that requires creating a permanent position.  Business needs change and temp-to-perm employees solve an immediate talent shortage that organizations face– while providing the opportunity to keep a long-term employee.

Should you hire a temp-to-perm employee?

Consider the following.

You need talent, fast. You can expedite the interview and on-boarding process by bringing on contract talent quickly.  You avoid the lengthy perm interview process as well as the possibility that the talent you want is scooped up by another company while you get through your standard interview process.

You want to try before you buy. Temp-to-perm gives both you and the employee the opportunity to see if the job is right for them.  The prospect for a long-term position is available, but neither side is obligated to extend past the initial contract period.  The contract portion of this model is defined and gives both parties an out.

Off boarding is easier.  The contract has a clear end date that both the company and employee have agreed to. Off boarding a contractor is faster and doesn’t come with the potential morale dip that permanent employees may feel if they were to lose a colleague hired into a permanent position.

Initial feelings on long-term fit aren’t critical. You need to create an immediate, temporary solution to a business problem.  You can hire someone with the right skills, even if you aren’t sure that they will be the right fit for a long-term position.  This gives you both the opportunity to try out the relationship through the contract.  You may be surprised about how well someone integrates into your team– especially if they didn’t initially feel like the right long-term hire.

Saving Equity. If you are looking to save equity that is typically offered to permanent employees, consider hiring a consultant and paying them a higher hourly rate.

The right culture fit. If you’ve found the right person to fit your position but they are light on a few skills that you’d ideally like in a permanent employee, this contract is an opportunity to see how they learn and develop their abilities.  The right employee who is equally as talented and motivated to learn can be critical to sustained success.


Looking for more resources to help with your job search? Contact Talener or check out some of our latest info on resume templates, offer rejection, and more!


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Posted in Career Tips, Talener Blog

6 Reasons Your Job Offer Was Rejected

September 18th, 2019

After four rounds of interviews, exchanged emails, and the OK from HR, you’re ready to make the hire. You send over the job offer and wait for them to accept.  But instead, you get a polite rejection; ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’  

Where did it fall apart? Were there warning signs? In many industries, competition for talent is tight and candidates have more opportunities than ever.  It’s easy to blame a better last-minute opportunity or a fickle personality –but what if the reason they didn’t take the job was because of your hiring process?

The competition worked faster.  You may have gotten the offer letter out first, but did you create a sense of urgency with your new hire? Did you schedule interviews quickly, avoiding lag time where the candidate might question how enthusiastic you are about them? If there was no way to shorten the process, did you ensure that the applicant knew next steps and provide timeline expectations? Chances are, if they are as good as you think they are, other companies will feel the same way and act quickly.

Compensation & benefits were unclear.Compensation and benefits are a sensitive subject, but at some point in the process, applicants must weigh factors beyond the base salary. Being upfront about benefits might save you and the candidate from any confusion when the offer rolls around.  While your benefits may be comprehensive, if, the cost of your health insurance premium is significantly more expensive than what they are currently paying – the salary increase, or ancillary benefits may not matter in the long run.

You didn’t showcase your working environment. If your candidates are whisked from reception to a conference room and back again, they can only imagine what they will encounter as an employee. From décor to seating arrangements, more than one-third of their day will be spent with co-workers in that space. Showcasing the day-to-day, allowing them to take in the buzz, and get the lay of the land goes a long way in getting them to imagine themselves physically and mentally in the space.

Your offer is one-size fits all. Sometimes, bureaucracy gets in the way.  There are strict salary caps or non-negotiable vacation policies.  But a little creativity and flexibility go a long way.  Decipher their motivations and offer solutions or benefits that seal the deal. Flexible hours, work-from-home opportunities, or extended lunches to get in a gym session can tip the scale in your favor.

They took a deep dive into your company culture. Entertaining multiple interviews or offers affords candidates the ability to take a closer look at your company – online and offline. As they move forward in the interview process, reviews and feedback on Yelp, Glassdoor, or social media influence final acceptance decisions.

They feel rushed.   You can’t wait around forever – but you can give candidates a few days to mull over an offer.  It’s unfair to make a candidate run the interview gauntlet for weeks or months; only to pressure them to accept the offer immediately.

If you are looking to streamline your hiring process, please contact Talener for advice and guidance about creating a more candidate-friendly, efficient system.


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Posted in Client News, Talener Blog

Leveraging Resume Templates

July 22nd, 2019

Job hunting is a full-time job. And on top of that, you may be working a full-time job.  Prepping for interviews, researching companies, and crafting the perfect eye-catching resume takes up valuable time in what can be an already stressful process.

But how do you take a step back and let someone else do some of the work?  By using resume templates, you can create clean, formatted, and easy-to-read resumes in minutes. Instead, spend your valuable time on crafting the perfect content.

Once you’ve mapped out the important talking points around your experience, education, projects, and specific skills, you can identify the right template for you.

Consider the following:

How long is my resume?

At some point in your career, your resume will spill over onto a second page.  Your skillset or industry might demand very detailed information that takes up space, i.e. technology languages or frameworks. Evaluate how the template will display the information.  Is the most important information displayed first? If the hiring manager doesn’t make it to page two, will you still be in the running for the position?

Is my resume going through keyword-matching software?

If you are conducting your job search on your own, do you know how the resumes are reviewed at the companies at which you are applying? Are you joining the black hole of keyword-matching software or is a member of staff looking at individual resumes?

What file type do I need?

If you know the companies you are targeting, take a quick look to see what file types they accept. It’s frustrating to craft the perfect resume, just to realize that the file extension isn’t accepted.

Is the format right for parsing?

We’ve all been here: ‘Please upload your resume’

‘Now, please type in almost the exact same information – even though you just uploaded your resume’

‘Or, let us pull the information from your resume’

If you’ve ever allowed resume parsing, you know that it rarely matches the fields exactly and you must retype your resume information anyway. If parsing is a standard in your industry – opt for simple, clean formatting without all of the bells and whistles.

What type of template matches my job aspirations?

Your resume is a reflection of you as well as the type of work that you do.  Your resume is the first glance into your abilities. How creative, organized, long, or colorful does it need to be to catch and retain the attention of your future hiring manager?

Getting Templates:

Google Templates:

If you have a Google account, you have access to Google’s library of templates. Sign into your Google account or navigate to https://drive.google.com/templates to access resumes, cover letters, and more in your Google Drive.

Google Resume Templates

LinkedIn Resume Assistant in Microsoft Word:

Microsoft’s acquisition of LinkedIn helpted the two join forces to bring better resume templates and a resume assistant to Microsoft Word.  If you are an Office 365 subscriber on Windows, customized templates and resume writing help are at your fingertips.  Check out LinkedIn’s Blog or get started in Word by opening a new document and choosing a resume template.

Microsoft Word and LinkedIn Resume

Canva:

If you’re looking for a template to give you more creative license, sign up for a free account on Canva and get started with more free templates. Or, sign up for the pro-version to get custom-tailored designs.

Design your resume with Canva Pro

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Posted in Career Tips, Talener Blog

Asking the Right Questions: Accepting a Job During the Pandemic

April 27th, 2020

Four people are around a table with laptops. A woman and man are sitting, smiling. Two men are standing, shaking hands across the table.
Young modern men in smart casual wear shaking hands and smiling while working in the creative office

Even if you find yourself in a position or an industry that has been spared from severe economic hardship or layoffs, there is still anxiety about changing jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Knowing what types of questions to ask a potential new employer or a recruiter is critical to your career when there are so many unknowns. There is a new normal that we will face, and it is important to understand how it will impact your new job.

Consider the following questions as you navigate the hiring process during this time?

Have you had to lay off or furlough any staff? Which ones?

This question can be asked in many ways, but it is important to understand the general well-being of the organization. If there are lay offs or furloughs, who were they?

Is there a waiting period for health benefits?

For many, COBRA or the health insurance marketplace may be too expensive – even in the short-term. Find out if there is a waiting period on health benefits. If there is, ask them to waive it and negotiate this into your package.

How will I be on-boarded?

If your potential employer is currently WFH, how are they on-boarding new employees? Will you receive equipment? Will you have someone to walk you through the first few days in the same way you would in an office / team setting? How are they dealing with team introductions and assignments?

How am I being evaluated?

It is important to understand the how and what of evaluation if you will be starting your new job while working at home (when you would otherwise be in an office environment –even partially).

What are the measures of success? Am I expected to produce on the first day? The first week? The first month? Who will be evaluating my performance? Who can I go to with questions?

When am I expected to be available?

Find out whether you have core hours or whether you have flexibility. Will this continue once things are back to ‘normal’? If the position is traditionally in-office, how many days will you be expected in the physical office?

Is there any flexibility? For example, many schools or after-school care programs are closed for the remainder of the academic year.

What will the transition back to ‘normal’ be?

While a plan may not yet be fully formed, particularly in areas of high impact, it is reasonable to ask how the company will be addressing changes in the office – cleanings, social distancing, masks, seating arrangements, staggered shifts, in-person meetings, etc.  It is important to understand these changes and expectations.


The Talener team is currently working from home and providing continued (but adapted!) services to our clients and candidates. If you have questions about the types of companies that are hiring and how the hiring process is functioning during this time, please feel free to contact us.

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Posted in Career Tips, Talener Blog

On-Boarding Employees During COVID-19: ICE Relaxes Requirements

March 31st, 2020

While hundreds of thousands of people have faced layoffs over the past several weeks, hiring remains critical in areas such as healthcare (including telehealth), technology, and CPG. Many technology companies that support work-from-home efforts are seeing platform usage rise.  Microsoft Teams has seen a 775% increase in usage in areas that are largely affected by the virus.

These hiring shifts present unique circumstances for managers and recruiters alike, as they attempt to on-board new staff while also meeting I-9 and E-Verify guidelines. The Department of Homeland Security has announced that they will temporarily be flexible regarding the I-9 guidelines for as long as the national emergency surrounding COVID-19 exists or 60 days from March 20th, 2020 (whichever comes first).

For employers and recruiters who are following COVID-19 guidelines, particularly in regard to limiting physical proximity – ICE is allowing new employee identity and employment authorization documents to initially be reviewed without a physical presence.  Documents should still be reviewed remotely.

The full press release explains the steps that employers should take to virtually and then physically examine the documents once normal operations resume. Please read the official Department of Homeland Security press release here for specific employer requirements.

This temporary flexibility for on-boarding only applies to employers and workplaces who are currently operating remotely and have no employees physically present and able to inspect I-9 documentation.

This declaration by DHS is an important part of helping the wider community fill their business needs, without burdening employers and recruiters with the physical presence requirements.

During this time, Talener is prepared for virtual on-boarding and is working closely with candidates and clients to help them understand this temporary on-boarding change.

If you have any questions about on-boarding new employees during this time, please reach out to your Talener representative. Talener is proud to support our candidates and clients during this time.

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Posted in Talener Blog, Uncategorized

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