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Where Technology Meets Staffing
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Henry Boulos, EVP Talener

Our eyes open. We reach for the alarm – and for many, this means the first contact with the connected world. Messages, breaking news & alerts inundate our day before we’ve even rolled back the blankets. In this world of the 24-hour news cycle and never-ending social media, everyone has an opinion, a cause, or a pitch.

We’re all searching for, waiting for, or trying the next ‘big thing’. This hyper-connected world we live in spills over as we make our way from our personal lives to our professional ones. It influences how we perceive culture, social justice, and life in the workplace.

But what happens when our perception of the right thing doesn’t align with the easiest thing in the workplace?

In 19 years of technology staffing, I’ve talked with thousands of hiring managers and have worked just as many jobs. From California to Chicago, Boston to New York, the sentiment from them is the same from hiring managers: make hiring easy for me.

It’s true; my job is to make theirs easier. They all want the best person for the job; the person who is the most skilled, the most experienced, and who will make the greatest immediate impact in the business. They aren’t consciously searching for diversity.

“I want a self-starter; someone who needs little guidance and seeks out problems on their own. Our environment is very challenging because of… I don’t have time or bandwidth to train anyone.” This feeling from hiring managers has been repeated over the years. It boils down to this: Diverse is hard. Different is hard.

From a logical perspective, we know that diversity and inclusion practices are good for business. Studies, including one by MIT, illustrate the benefits of diversity in the workplace as it pertains to productivity and the bottom line. Human resources and talent acquisition teams understand and promote the benefits of diversity. But from a practical perspective, hiring managers have an immediate need for talent and work piling up. It’s easy to want easy.

Feedback is very often simply, “Just not a fit for my team.” Homogeny of gender, race, experiences, etc. make the workplace more comfortable; but does it mean that those people share your company’s core vision or are the most engaged? Diversity and inclusion bring new ideas, new experiences, and those people who share the values and vision that make up an inspired – and ultimately more productive team.

Technology moves fast. The gap between qualified workers and open jobs grows daily. Taking time to hire someone based on who they can be versus who they have been, is a challenge. But if you truly want to build a diverse team, then training is required. A view through a different lens doesn’t mean that the employee is more difficult. But it means consciously training teams on how to accept and embrace a diverse and inclusive environment as well as address conflict resolution in a productive way.

While great strides have been made in diversity hiring, we have a long way to go. Without realizing it, we try to make hiring easy on ourselves through our own lens. Retention in technology jobs are at an all-time low and even Fortune 500 companies are seeing shorter and shorter tenures. So many companies are reading a resume and providing this kind of feedback…

“We want people from top-tier universities.”

“We want people coming from Google, Amazon and Facebook.”

“We only hire people that have XYZ on their resume.”

Our individual lens narrows the diversity and inclusive possibilities before the first interview. I credit companies and individuals for bringing a greater sense of awareness to the global need for diversity in technology. But are we all practicing what we preach? To go from an environment where diversity and inclusion are truly created, rather than just promoted, this thought process will need to be realigned.

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